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-- afghanistan, pakistan, yemen and somalia. it's estimated that the cia and the united states military have undertaken more than three hundred drone strikes and killed about 2500 people. it's clear we have yet to understand the full impact of the country's drone war. one former obama security adviser calls the use of drone counterproductive. use of drones counterproductive, that is. and retired general stanley mcchrystal who championed use of drones in afghanistan is now advising caution. he says what scares me about the drone strikes is how they are perceived around the world. the resentment created by the use of american unmanned strikes is much greater than the average american anticipates and appreciates. they are hated on a visceral level, even by people who have never seen one or seen the everythings of one. yet earlier this week, the president nominated a man widely viewed as the administration's drone warrior to head the cia. obama counterterrorism adviser john brennan has made the legal case for targeted killings. some are now expressing concern over brennan in charge of the cia. a
, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has a colin -- it is what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administration. i know that john kerry cares deeply about our country and our national security. i know he believes in
against the united states in a country like pakistan and each at, which are large recipients of the public majority that is military, but there is a very powerful sentiment that this evil don't like us. they take our money and burn our flag. luscious cut them off. obviously there's been resolutions and so forth. talk about how you respond to you think the country how to respond to that very powerful sentiment. >> well, the common thread here is the presence of al qaeda and its affiliates in the threat that poses to the world from the standpoint of stability and peaceful transition of government. we are reminded that almost every day and it's a crested that sweeps across the middle of the world, starting in indignation at coming across northern africa and now moving down to the sub-saharan parts of africa. this is a threat that has enormous implications. we've seen ignoring the threat as we did in afghanistan pre-9/11 leads to dire consequences potentially for americans. it is true the american public is more weary, but nevertheless we are reminded every day that works and journalists -- >>
-- taliban commander is reported dead in pakistan. the united states killed the commander in pakistan and his deputy and eight others. washington did not confirm the strike but officials say he has a great deal of blood on his hand and his death would be a significant blow to the taliban stronghold in the area. >> he was just the latest terrorist leader to die in the drone strike but such targeted killings are not without controversy particularly regarding the assassination of al qaeda leader al-awlaki in yemen in 2011. that is because he was actually a u.s. citizen born in new mexico. but there is a government memo outlining the legal justification for killing an american without a trial. however, a judge ruled the memo can stay secret and she said there is no legal way to force the justice department to make it public. now, a former assistant u.s. attorney in the eastern district of new york. before we get to the secret memo , dispense of the question that many may have: isn't it true that during war the killing of an enemy combatant regardless whether he is an american citizen or not is in
and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sedan. -- sudan. historians will be judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy at much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i want to ask john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to eject. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has -- it is what we do. we fight for people back,. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administration. i know that john kerry cares deeply about our c
weapon. pakistan is probably building more nuclear weapons than any other country in the world. pakistan is a very fragile system that can disintegrate at any time. we're not prepared for that. the whole challenge of the persian gulf, we're not prepared for that. i think it's accurate to say that by appointing the secretary of state and the secretary of defense that he has, john kerry and hagel, they're communicating accurately the minimalist approach to the world. you can make a case for that. but neither, neither of them nor the president has a positive vision of how you're going to deal with a worldwide virus that is increasingly destabilizing the planet. and that's what's happening from pakistan through north africa to syria and i think potentially in europe and the united states. >> i have less than a minute here. i need one-word answers from you. joe biden made a bit of a slip up talking about how hap he was going to be president of the united states. >> joe biden would be happy to be president of the united states and i think he is planning to run, if possible. >> quickly. >> i th
kerry, who would probably be the next extra state might tilt toward pakistan. whenever there is a problem in pakistan, we sort of rush over there to save the place, meaning we're more on pakistan's side than new delhi. a former indian ambassador to the u.s. three times within one week complained to me about washington's policies express a lot of concerns. ashley: wasn't bin laden found in pakistan and can argue the authorities really let us down? >> they really did. the networks killing american soldiers and they are directing these terrorist attacks against india and it just two weeks ago in india you had these border shooting industries, indian soldiers were beheaded. this is very serious for new delhi. ashley: thank you very much for being here. tracy: as the president returns to the white house, rich edson standing by to talk to us about today's events in washington. ashley: drew barrymore teaming up with the corporate name while phil mickelson says he may cut his game short because of taxes. it's liberty money headlines when we come back. twins. i didn't see them c
policy board and has served as a senior adviser as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrooke, former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy challenges of the day, you have to think about our next debater. his flagship global affairs overam on cnn is seen in 200 countries worldwide but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he rights a highly respected column for "the washington post" and is the editor-at-large of "time" magazine. his numerous best selling books include "the post-american world" and "the future of freedom." please welcome back to the munk debate stage, broadcaster and journalist, fareed zukaria. we are just moments from getting our debate underway but before we hear from opening statements, once again, i'm going to need this audience's assistance as the night goes on to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remarks and that we move forward as a debate together so you will see this countdown clock
in pakistan. the u.s. war on terror grown reliant on the unmanned vehicles that are prepared for flight an armed with the hell fire missiles. >> i believe john brennan taking over at c.i.a. will ensure that the drone program will comet. the administration has been -- and brennan particular, selling us on the fact that drones is the magic weapon. >> bret: >> reporter: president bam banal herted the drones from the predecessor. despite his criticism of bush, he has empanded the program employing agilities to authorize 300 drone strikes that killed # ,500 people. it has long strangeed relakes with pakistan and civilian who complain about the civilian casualties. >> we endeavor to redouse zillian casualties as much as possible. -- civilian casualties as much as possible. taking the fight to al-qaeda made the united states safer. >> worked to embed evidents to a strong legal frame wok. >> civil bi liberty groups. >> the u.s. government is using drones far from the battlefield to kill people who are not presenting any threat to the united states. that is the under which force used forren the
of classification, but i believe the secrecy surrounding drones particularly with respect to pakistan works with to our advantage. i hope the administration finds ways to be more transparent going forward. this is a full plate for john kerry. we have known crisis dealing with syria. can we have a meaningful conversation with iran. he'll be at the forefront of creating a sustainable relationship and a working relationship with new leadership in china. he has been very involved over the years but only in pakistan issues afghanistan issues. he'll work the diplomat iic aspect of the war and he has been involved in the crisis of sudan. if the list wasn't long enough there is the emerging challenge in mali and across and of courseofcourse britain's role, he'll be looking at the concerns of the united states about britain turning inward as opposed to being a strong voice within the european union. very complex issues that he'll wrestle with over the next four years. >> jennifer: you covered my list of questions so i really appreciate that former assistant secretary of state p.j. crowley. thank you
. iraq, afghanistan and pakistan so every country in the world we are under the kind of contracting world that i think do interfere with our capacity to get the best deal, particularly when it comes to security that we should in these countries where the threats unfortunately are going to always be with us. >> should we look to extend that to the drc come to somalia? >> there was an article i think in one of the newspapers today that went into some detail. basically years has started. federal law required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractor to provide local card services at its embassies abroad and there's that old saying you get what you pay for and this lowest price provision started off in 1990, but it has just stayed with us and i would respectfully request that this committee would take a hard look at it. you can't do a total lifting of it for everybody at least look at the highest post where obviously we did it for iraq and afghanistan and pakistan and the countries that you are naming our countries that i think would fall into that category.
tint, pakistan use -- i mean at this point pakistan was a country where america was admired widely. our image in that nation was plummeted because in large measure because of this drone policy we have. i think the real problem is that you know, because we can do something, we haven't slowed down to ask should we do it? yeah, we had the technology, smart people who can run a drone. well what about the human element here where we make sure that we are respecting civilians, that we make sure that there is a quantum of proof that is reviewable before we decide to execute a human being including a u.s. citizen. and of course, all of this stuff is made a little more complicated because you take a guy like anwar al-awlaki bad guy. no doubt about it. and if you use a policy to get after a bad guy, then you never review the policy because the outcome was a bad guy. but we need to review this policy and start getting our hands around it to say does america want to be a country that abandoned the rule of law that abandoned the geneva convention, that doesn't have any reviewability, that doesn't --
of afghanistan and pakistan -- previously opposed the surge in afghanistan. these are issues the need to be addressed. where do we think afghanistan is going to go? why did he think at one point that afghanistan was such a strategic interest? senator hagel has made a lot of statements over the years about the middle east and central asia that i think have to be addressed. israel-u.s. relationships have to be put into context. i think the caller started them. but the fact is not simply that it is between the u.s. and israel, there are statements the senator made on the sanctions on iran. top of the dictatorship in syria. not signing on to a resolution, asking europe to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization. on and on. the context suggests that his views about the middle east and his use about the palestinian it-is really conflict have to be brought together with those other statements to get a bigger picture of how he thinks about the middle east. i think it is rare that a nominee -- i do think that people often say the president should give deference to his and -- to his app
a suspectedu drone strike in pakistan's tribal areas. the target, three taliban compounds. it is believed two major commanders are among the dead, in the unsupervised bomb squads. that's the third u.s. drone strike in five days itch there was a sharp divide in congress between those who voted for the fiscal cliff bill and those who did not -- taxes versus spending. but will those differences come up again in the debt ceiling debate? we have jeff duncan, a republican from south carolina, and representative elliot engle, a democrat from new york. gentlemen, thank you for joining us. representative duncan, you voted against the fiscal cliff deal. tell us why? >> absolutely. we are not in this situation in america with our economy and our government because we have under-taxed americans. we are here because we spend too much money. this plan had over $40 of tax revenue increases for every dollar that was cult. it should be $44 for cuts fur every dollar increased. >> you voted for the deal, wiam sure, reservations, as many have excess expressed? >> you either accept the deal or go over the fiscal
and japan? i'm not sure about the muslim brotherhood aid but on pakistan that's been a big issue, both republicans and depps have said, we need to pare back that aid to pakistan. senator rand paul has been pushing that. others like senator john mccain say, we can't just cut them off. foreign aid is very important if we want to get them to do what we want them to do and foster democracy. host: before we let you go here, we're going to take another phone cull, but tell us the fresh minnesota class, some names and faces people should be looking out for, people who might make a name for themselves in the 113th? guest: one is senator tim kaine, he beat george allen in the election, a former governor, he's close to president obama. he was almost picked as vice president. obama and kain talked about him running in the senate, then he ended up winning. that's a democrat to watch. you have to watch the democrats in the senate. elizabeth warren won a huge battle with senator scott broun. -- scott brown. how is she going to operate? the financial industry is a little nervous about elizabeth warre
of independence with pakistan. demonstrators hurled stones at cops. they fired back with tear gas and rubber bullets and made several arrests. united kingdom. zoo keepers starting the annual animal census at the zoo. workers have-to-count more author man 17,000 animals. the facility holds 750 different species from ben begins to near cats. a pair of endangered is a mat tran tigers. part of a rehearsal for the opening of the city's summer festival this weekend. the duck's designer says the 50 symbol meant to bring people together and turn the harbor into a giant bathtub and that's a rap on this fox trip around the world in will 0 seconds. scientists say somebody stumbled across a discovery they say is billions of years old. what's inside this hunk of rock could unravel some of mars biggest mysteries. that's next. aig? we said we were going to turn it around, and we did. woman: we're helping joplin, missouri, come back from a devastating tornado. man: and now we're helping the t recover from hurricane sandy. we're a leading global insurance company, based right here in america. we've repaid ev
see along the afghan/pakistan border. >> the can of worms is open. if we can't put the can back on how much involvement are you willing to stomach? are you willing to say we will put boots on the ground, something the obama administration does not want to do and the american people do not want to do right now? >> you have to ask. there are a whole series of options here that we can put into play. and it has to be a coordinated effort. this isn't just about mali. the french have very capable special forces. they are going to put hurt on these folks. there are things we can do for them short of boots on the ground. i would encourage the president to continue to do that. if you -- this is going to get worse. you cannot allow this to become a national security issue for the united states. i argue it has crossed that threshold. this area now attracting jihadists and they are really good at this stuff including hostage taking because they have been doing it for decades and have been the largest funder to al qaeda. this is a problem we have to deal with. we all ought to sit down and try to co
campaign in pakistan. more evidence that the followers are making north africa and yemen the base of operation. >> this is a fox news alert. state department put out word hillary clinton was discharged from the hospital. the medical team advises she is making good progress on all fronts and confident she will make a full recovery from the blood clot in her skull. we were told she had not been released though we had photo of video of her outside the hospital today now. the state department put out official release she has been released from the hospital. fox all-stars weigh in on a big fight op capitol hill next. ...so as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? >>> i'm give
in pakistan. >> and it's happened in pakistan. and the long-term impact -- i've said here -- the long-term impact of indiscriminately dropping, you know, bombs on civilians to kill terrorists. >> right. >> has long-term implications for us. we're going to be paying for as a country for decades to come. >> there's a short-term benefit, but the long-term consequences that people not liking americans are feeling that america isn't back to predator nation. >> it's beyond that. you kill my 4-year-old daughter, i don't just not like you. >> yeah. >> i spend the rest of my life trying to destroy you. and that's happening. again, it's not just happening in countries where we have declared war. we're now going into country after country after country. and i guess, rick, what i don't understand is where are the civil liberties lawyers, the constitutional lawyers that were so concerned during the bush administration, for good reason, about how far we push the boundaries in the war on terror? where are those people now that we are killing innocent civilians across the world? >> well, we're still
have pakistan next door. that is still where the majority of the terrorism that affects us is coming from. but i think people do understand particularly after osama bin laden was killed that we need to draw down significantly. that we need to scale back our presence in the region. because look at the end of the day we're not going to create a jeffersonian democracy in afghanistan. that's not something we even really want to do as a nation. we really want to focus more at home. >> i'm going to switch gears right now. and i'll start with joy here with regard to the talk about the president's cabinet picks this week. there's been so much discussion about that. some people have been criticizing the president for his lack of diversity. in fact, here's what congressman charlie rangel said about this on msnbc. here it is. >> it's embarrassing as hell. we've been through all this with mitt romney. we were very hard on mitt romney with his women binder. >> so overly harsh assessment by the congressman? what do you think? >> it's three people. i find it a little bit funny that we're going into
because of the sort of backlash against the united states and u.s. installations and country like pakistan and egypt which are large recipient of the united. there's a powerful sentiment that the people don't us. they take the money and burn the flag. let cut them off. there's resolutions and stuff introduces. talk about how you respond or how you think the country ought to respond to the powerful sentiment. >> well, i think the common threat here is the presence of al qaeda and the affiliate. and the threat it poses to the world. from the standpoint of stability. and peaceful transition of governments. we're reminded of that almost every day. and -- sweeps across the middle of the world starting in indonesia and coming across northern africa and moving down to the sub sahara part of africa. this is a threat that has enormous implications. we have seen that ignoring the threat as we did in afghanistan pre 9/11. t true that the american public is more wary but never the less, we're reminding every day on cnn n and other networks and journalists from "the washington post . >> talk more i wan
making news today. gunmen killing five female teachers and two other people in northwest pakistan. many militants in the conservative province where the attack took place oppose education for women and have targeted them in the past. >>> in venezuela a somber scene as residents pray for the president there, hugo chavez. the leader is taking a turn for the worse after his latest cancer surgery. >>> along the ivory coast in africa, 60 people were crushed to death in a new year's eve stadium stampede after a fireworks display. nearly 200 more were injured. heather: iran's military issuing warnings to foreign planes and warships as the country conducts five games of war games near the strategically important strait of hormuz where 1/5 of the world's oil passes through this key waterway. leland vittert is live this morning in our middle east newsroom with the very latest. leland? >> reporter: heather, these warnings were likely to either u.s. or western allies plane, ships, reconnaissance aircraft those kind of things spying on these war games. you might say here we go again. for iran war ga
saw in pakistan, afghanistan. they find large open areas of land, failed states, weak states where they can kind of operate outside the reach of the law, but very close to strategic interests, things that are important. al qaeda, which is also believed to be linked to the benghazi attacks, and now this incident. there's a long list of this pattern of behavior that has indicated they're becoming more potent, more lethal, and more dangerous as a result of the weak and failed states in the western part of africa. >> glen, in terms of the white house on this, you know, with syria, where the situation has not gotten markedly better. there are rumors about whether or not there was a cable detailing the syrian government using chemical weapons on its own people the president has drawn a shifting line. what is on his plate in terms of foreign policy is daunting. how much capital does he have to tackle that? he is going to have to deal with it one way or another, and to really draw american attention and resources to what's happening overseas. >> he has drawn a line in the sandstorm, right?
, pakistan, north korea whh hashe bomben like iran and that is just ticking away. there's the egypt problem, there's what's going on recently in algeria and so forth. so i think the theme here for president obama is going to have to be i need to smoke the peace pipe domestically in this country with the political opposition and i need to work and develop friendships abroad and develop some overall strategy for dealing with this very dangerous lull. >> rose: just drill down on that temperament for the president who had an overwhelming electoral victory. >> i think franklin roosevelt would have disagreed. he said the election of 1936 was a great landslide and gave him the opportunity to define his opposition during that campaign. he said they're unanimous in their hate for me and i welcome their hatred, the economic royalists. so i think what roosevelt would have said on the other side would have been if you begin to define them before americans reach their own conclusion that can be a big weapon especially for a second term president who is going to encounter these institutional constraints.
looks like it's dividing itself, it seems reminiscent of pakistan and how its fledgling democracy works between the civilian and the military relationship. >> well, there are a lot of the chronic problems in egypt. no doubt for six years, egypt's major institution was the military. they were the major power brokers, in fact, all of the previous leaders of this country came from the military. mohamed morsi is the first civilian leader to be elected. a lot of people feel that the military and the muslim brotherhood have cut a deal. a lot of people feel the military still pulse a lot of strings behind the scenes of what is happening here. you have a lot of institutional problems in the state as the country tries to grapple with new realities of trying to build democratic institutions that for so many years have been anything but c democratic. >> how can morsi end this crisis? >>. >> well, right now, he feels he has a democratic mandate. he has a large popular base of support. he won the elections. his constitution was passed in a nationwide referendum. his party won a majority in the parli
enthusiastically embraced drones. more than 300 in pakistan last year since obama took office. so it's something that obama's come to rely on very much but we still haven't clarified the legalities. >> and international opposed to domestic. harold ford jr. on "morning joe" today and former congressman, obviously, and he pointed out he get it is controversy and the moral issue but when it comes to putting boots on the ground, see it is logic in using drones in that respect. and i think a lot of people might agree with him to save a life of a soldier using a drone and then talking about domestically, people change. no one wants a drone over the home growing pot or not and some of the usage of the law enforcement personnel. >> sure. by the way, we right now are the only drone superpower. that's not to stay the same. drones are not hard to fly. other countries will be using them. we have to think about the precedent we are setting on the international scene for the use of drones. we fly them in to other people's countries and kill people there. if somebody did that to us, we'd be upset. >> everyone
mongerer from pakistan? >> reporter: the catchy phrase has hooked people into the new year. the clip reeled in more than 16 million views on youtube and already is an itunes hit. >>> fish man, we have to come up with something. >> that's a lot. >> yes, indeed. >> what's coming up in sports? >> great sports. terps trying to keep their winning streak alive. after a record breaking the red test in the seahawks. that's all when "news4 at 6:00" continues. >>> hello. welcome back. i'm doug kammerer. not a bad day on january 1. we start off the year 2013, temperatures a little bit above average. 45 degrees. temperature right now. our average temperature is 44 for a high temperature today. not too bad. winds out of the northwest, 8 miles per hour. we continue to see the cloud cover. those clouds may hold the temperatures up a little bit tonight. that's good news. tomorrow night they are going to be hold. 39 in gaithersburg. 44 in college park. 42 towards camp springs. friends in warrenton, hello to you. 39 degrees. how about front royal. front royal coming in at 38 degrees. starting to see t
them in afghanistan, we did take down the sanctuary. we drove them into pakistan. we stayed on al-qaida's central leadership in pakistan. the challenge is that al-qaida has spread its tentacles throughout the middle east and they are on the rice despite our effort to stay on top of us. >> i ask the question about the taliban and being brought into the central government in afghanistan, and what it would mean in that country. those are big questions that we won't be able to answer today, general keane but i'm sure we'll be talking about them in the future. it's great to have you on the show. >> good talking to you jenna as always too. jon: and update now on another government leader no friend to america, the prognosis for venezuelan leader hugo chavez sounds grim. he recently underwent his fourth cancer-related surgery in cuba. now his decision is being described as delicate. steve harrigan is following this live from miami. >> reporter: his condition is being described in many different waeufplts the official version from the government is as you said, delicate. it's come being fr
. in pakistan, in iraq, excuse me, in afghanistan, and yemen and elsewhere. and we do, as by necessity, rely on security professionals to implement the protocols and procedures necessary to keep our people safe and as i said in my opening statements, i have a lot of confidence in them because, you know, most of the time they get it right. but i was also engaged, and i think this is what deputy secretary burns was referring to, in the issues related to the deteriorating threat environment, particularly in libya. there were other places across the region we were also watching to try to see what we could do to support the libyan government to improve the overall stability of their country, to deal with the many militias. we have many programs and actions that we were working on. i had a number of conversations with leading libyan officials, i went to libya in october, 2011. in fact, shortly before the attack on benghazi, we approved libya for substantial funding from a joint state dod account for border security, ct capabilities and wmd efforts. so i want to just clarify there were specific ins
, the footprint or the cape bill peas we have in other theaters. after years of focusing on pakistan and afghanistan, the map has changed. from mali to algeria, niger, libya, and egypt, the obama administration is struggling to catch up. u.s. intelligence is now working with france whose own spy networks are more established in the former french colonies in africa. and the u.s. will set up a base in niger to fly over safe havens, hoping to catch terrorists before there is a direct threat to the u.s.'s homeland. >> i'm not ruling it out. we take al qaeda wherever they are very seriously and we are not going to rest on our laurels until we find that kind of specific and credible information. >> one thing that has officials very concerned, terrorists operating in africa have u.s., western, european, canadian pass sports that can travel readily and come back to their home countries and it may be very difficult to catch their movements, especially if they are plotting more attacks. wolf? >> very difficult indeed. barbara, thanks very much. let's take a closer look right now at these lates
of any reasons to back this up. many of the detainees were arrested by pakistani authorities in pakistan. others were arrested in thailand by the police. you had nashiri who was arrested in to buy another arrested in somalia. the notion that we have to have the special forum that has battlefield conditions is a great smokescreen for this second-rate process that says more about us than about the people we are trying to bring before us. another important piece is the issue of torture. the senate select committee on intelligence completed their report recently and you probably saw john mccain and dianne feinstein said the report concludes torture did not work. they say it was a stain on our reputation. it is important that that report is declassified to the public in light of "zero dark 30." it is about the killing of osama bin laden bin laden. i think the movie will do for torture with jaws did for sharks. it will become the public perception of reality and it is a lie. i think that moving makes it doubly important for the senate select committee to report -- to get the report declassifie
-old originally from pakistan who moved to the uk on a student visa and was originally arrested back in 2009 for an alleged plot to alabama a shopping center in manchester england. he was released for lack of evidence but remained on the f.b.i.'s radar. he was extradited last week when his name surfaced into an investigation on a suicide bombing attack on the new york subway system that failed to be pulled off. he is the 8th defendant to face charges in brooklyn for the failed subway plot. you may remember one of his alleged coconspirators who pled guilty back in 2010. he and others were communicating with a shado shadowy al-qaida member. they were e-mailing phrases, such as marriage. he was stopped and the plot was foiled. nasir was using the name language as zazi while communicating with this guy in pack sthapb and was part of this kpheur to commit multiple terrorist attacks and that's why the u.s. attorney in the u.s. was able tow prosecute him. that first appearance scheduled about two hours from now. jenna we'll look forward to developments on that case. thank you. jon: a big take down
discusses bill and her commitment to pakistan, senator feinstein described herself as a mayor on a mission. senator feinstein, you had an array of current mayors on a mission spinning with you, ready to do whatever is necessary to make sure this bill becomes a law. let's move forward. thank you. [applause] good afternoon, everyone. thank you very much, senator feinstein. thank you to the colleagues in the senate and the members that are here today in support of this legislation. i'm speaking today on behalf of the major city chiefs cities chiefs association. we are an organization made up of the 63 largest cities in the united states and i have the honor of serving as president of the organization on my way down here, i was on the train i received a call from the executive director of the international association of chiefs of police, which is the largest of all the police organization. unfortunately they could not be here today, but they wanted me to pass on to you their support in this legislation. members and executives, my good friends and chair of the national prevention for gun viole
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